4) Bicycle rear derailleur compatibility

Note: this post explains bicycle rear derailleur compatibility, i.e. what derailleurs can work with which number of rear sprockets and which rear shifters. For explanation of other rear derailleur functioning and limitations, such as chain wrap capacity, read this article: Rear derailleur.

Basic terms and what to pay attention to

Most modern bicycles have index shifters, that work with a certain number of clicks. One click per gear change. That is moving the chain from one sprocket/chainring to another with each click.

In order for this to work, these things need to be in tune:

  • Length of cable that shifter pulls/releases with each click. This is called shifter cable pull.
  • Ratio of distance that rear derailleur  (RD in the remainder of this text) moves laterally per cable movement. This is called rear shift ratio. E.g. if RD moves for 2 mm for 1 mm cable movement (pull or release), then the rear shift ratio is 2.
  • Rear sprocket spacing.

When RD compatibility is mentioned, it is all about it’s tune with the shifter cable pull and rear sprocket spacing. When it is all set up correctly, one click of the indexed shifter changes exactly and correctly one gear, that is one sprocket, at the rear. Compatibility will be explained per number of gears and per manufacturer. If it is not noted otherwise, it is understood that shifter make and number of gears match the RD make and the actual number of rear sprockets. There are three major RD and shifter manufacturer standards:

  1. Shimano
  2. SRAM
  3. Campagnolo

1. Shimano

6, 7, 8 and 9 speeds

Rear shift ratio is 1.7, that is for 1 mm of cable pull/release, RD is moved left/right by 1.7 mm. Shimano calls this 2:1 ratio for marketing reasons.

All these RDs are compatible and any 6 to 9 speed RD will work perfectly with either 6, 7, 8 or 9 speed shifter. Regardless whether it’s a MTB, or road shifter, or RD. They are also compatible with Shimano 10 speed road shifters, except the Tiagra 4700 series.

Shimano Dura Ace from 1984 to 1996 period (6 to 8 speeds)

Rear shift ratio is 1.9. They are compatible only with Shimano Dura Ace shifters from the same period (that is for 6, 7 and 8 speeds).

10 speed ROAD RD

Rear shift ratio is 1.7, so it’s compatible with all the 6 to 9 speed shifters, as well as road 10 speed shifters. Same rear shift ratio. MTB 10 (and 11 speed) shifters won’t work well.

Exception is Shimano Tiagra 4700 10 speed road RD – it has the same shift ratio as Shimano road 11 speed RDs, so it will work only with Tiagra 4700 shifters and Shimano 11 speed road shifters.

10 speed MTB RD

Rear shift ratio of this RD is about 1.2. It is only compatible with Shimano 10 speed MTB shifters and nothing else. Shimano calls this system Dyna-Sys.

11 speed ROAD

Rear shift ratio is around 1.4.  Only compatible with Shimano 11 speed road shifters.

The same shift ratio is used for Tiagra 4700 10 speed groupset, so it’s compatible with it as well, but not with other 10 speed road groupsets.

Rear shift ratio of 1.4 matches old Campagnolo ratio, but I haven’t tested this in practice.

11 speed MTB

Rear shift ratio is around 1.1. Compatible with Shimano MTB 11 speed shifters. Shimano calls this system Dyna-Sys, same as 10 speed MTB, but they’re not compatible!

It has similar rear shift ratio to SRAM 1:1 standard (explained later in this post), so it should match it as well, but I haven’t tried it yet!

2. SRAM

SRAM has four RD families, with 4 different amounts of RD movement per cable movement (actuation ratios). So the only thing to pay attention to is actuation ratio. As long as the RD matches shifter’s actuation ratio (and vice versa), it will work fine.

First, less popular family of SRAM RDs are the ones compatible with Shimano 2:1 standard. Rear shift ratio of 1.7 means they will work with Shimano (and SRAM 2:1) shifters for 6 to 9 speeds (both road and MTB) and road 10 speed ones, except Tiagra 4700 10 speed road shifters.
RDs made in this standard were marketed as 6, 7, 8 and 9 speed models, though this is determined by the shifter – RD doesn’t care how many rear sprockets there are.

Second, more popular SRAM standard is 1:1, with rear shifter ratio of 1.1. This shift ratio is the same as Shimano MTB 11 speed RD (and shifter), so they should be compatible, but I haven’t tested this yet.
RDs made in this standard were marketed as 7, 8 and 9 speed models.

Third, newer standard is Exact Actuation. Rear shifter ratio is 1.3.
Marketed as 10 speed road and MTB , as well as 11 speed road.

Fourth family is X-Actuation, with 1.12 ratio.
Available as 11 and 12 speed MTB RDs 

3. Campagnolo

Campagnolo has two standards of rear shift ratio. Old 1.4 and new 1.5. Also, not every shifter pulls the same amount of cable with each click. With 10 speed for example, there is more cable pull for “slower” speeds, than there is for the others.  2.5 mm pull five times (from smallest 1st to the 6th sprocket), 3 mm for 7th and 8th, then 3.5 mm for 9th and 10th. 2.83 mm average cable pull per click.  🙂

Since Campagnolo cassettes sprocket spacing differs from other manufacturers’, it is hard to combine Campagnolo RDs with anything but the appropriate Campagnolo shifters and in most cases cassettes too.

List of rear shift ratios for various standards:

Shimano standard – 1.7 SRAM 2:1 – 1.7 Campagnolo old – 1.4
Shimano 10 MTB – 1.2 SRAM 1:1 – 1.1 Campagnolo new – 1.5
Shimano 11 road – 1.4 SRAM Exact Actuation – 1.3
Shimano 11 MTB – 1.1 SRAM X-Actuation – 1.12  
Shimano Dura Ace 6 to 8 speeds – 1.9
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3 Replies to “4) Bicycle rear derailleur compatibility”

  1. Thanks for great article. How about chain compatibility? Is a 10-speed RD compatible whith a 8-speed chain? Does the cage width and pulley wheel design differ between 8 and 10 speed or is it the same?. Thanks again for good work ☺

    1. Since all the multi speed chains have the same inner (roller) width, special pulley design won’t know what kind of chain goes over the pulley wheels.

      As for cage width, differences aren’t enough to cause problems. Especially from 10 to 8 speeds. Haven’t tried a 6 speed chain with an 11 speed RD, but I doubt even that would cause problems.

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